Metric bolt question

 
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Old 01-05-2018, 01:04 PM
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Metric bolt question

Since the US decided not to go metric, why are there metric bolts on f-150?
 
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Old 01-05-2018, 02:05 PM
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You will find a mix of US and metric in any current domestic vehicle. The domestic manufacturers source parts from worldwide.
 
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Old 01-05-2018, 02:11 PM
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OK Got it. Thanks ---- Say hello to Jamie MacMurray!
 
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Old 01-05-2018, 03:55 PM
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The US didn't change the national standards, the individual company can design their parts in whatever standard they want. On a modern F-150 you would be hard pressed to find anything that isn't metric.
 
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Old 01-06-2018, 04:24 PM
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We don't measure or weigh stuff or gauge speed in metrics in the U.S. .. What fasteners are used is up to whatever the manufacturer wants to use.

Older vehicles have more standard fasteners on them, but the newer ones are pretty much all metric fasteners now a days. I still do find that some standard sockets fit better on some bolts while metric fits better on others.

Good luck!

Mitch
 
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Old 01-07-2018, 03:32 PM
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Originally Posted by MitchF150 View Post
We don't measure or weigh stuff or gauge speed in metrics in the U.S. .. What fasteners are used is up to whatever the manufacturer wants to use.

Older vehicles have more standard fasteners on them, but the newer ones are pretty much all metric fasteners now a days. I still do find that some standard sockets fit better on some bolts while metric fits better on others.

Good luck!

Mitch
I agree!
 
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Old 01-07-2018, 08:15 PM
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And they use torx a lot. It's to fuel the tool industry! Everyone has to have many sets of tools. Maybe the purpose is to discourage owners from working on their own vehicles! Joking but there may be some truth there.
 
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Old 01-07-2018, 08:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Roadie View Post
And they use torx a lot. It's to fuel the tool industry! Everyone has to have many sets of tools. Maybe the purpose is to discourage owners from working on their own vehicles! Joking but there may be some truth there.
Reminds me of my '00 Dakota that takes a rare 17mm hex to remove the drain plug on the tranny (NVG3500). Why not a regular bolt??
 
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Old 01-07-2018, 09:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Roadie View Post
And they use torx a lot. It's to fuel the tool industry! Everyone has to have many sets of tools. Maybe the purpose is to discourage owners from working on their own vehicles! Joking but there may be some truth there.
Torx and Allen heads are much better for higher torque or having a machine install them than a Phillips head. There's also external Torx and Triplesquare fasteners. The Germans really started using these fasteners but the US cars are starting to use them more. I've seen Torx (internal and external) on my 2011 truck.

All of these fasteners have more points of engagement than a Phillips or external hex. The Torx design has the tool engage in rounded portion instead of the pointed tips. This allows torque to be transferred without risk of stripping out the head better. It's a better design even if we have to buy a few new tools.
 

Last edited by Wookie; 01-07-2018 at 09:27 PM.
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Old 01-07-2018, 09:28 PM
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Originally Posted by ManualF150 View Post
Reminds me of my '00 Dakota that takes a rare 17mm hex to remove the drain plug on the tranny (NVG3500). Why not a regular bolt??
The internal hex design allows for a smaller head diameter than an external hex.
 
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Old 01-07-2018, 10:11 PM
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Yeah, I still have the special tool that I had to buy from the Mac Tool Truck to remove the head bolts from my 1971 Pinto 2.0L Ford of Germany engine. It had internal splines of some sort (not torx)I had never seen before. That OHC engine had a defect in that it developed an oil leak at the head/block mating surface. The Felpro head gasket I bought came with instructions to torque the head bolts about 15 to 20 ft. lbs. more than the Ford spec to keep the gasket from failing.
 
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Old 01-08-2018, 09:42 AM
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Just remember guys...
Thee are two kinds of countries in this world.
Those that use the Metric system.
And those that have put a man on the moon.
 
 


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