2015 - 2019 F-150

Towing a stock trailer

 
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Old 05-24-2019, 06:24 PM
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Towing a stock trailer

Please reassure me - I own a 2015 F-150 with a 3.5L V6 engine with included harness and trailer sway control. GVWR is 6300lbs, max trailering capacity is 7200lb and max tongue weight is 720lbs. Gross combined weight rating is 12,200lbs. Can I haul a 16ft bumper pull (hitch mounted to frame) steel stock trailer (approximately 2500-3000lbs dry) with 1 horse (MAYBE 1000lbs on a heavy day) without something blowing up or going horribly wrong? Trailer will have electric brakes and I'm a very careful driver. My idea of a big travel day is hauling half an hour down the road to ride with friends, straight highway and back roads - if I find mountains, I've gone 4 hours too far in the wrong direction. Occasionally, I might put a second horse in the trailer (also maybe 1000lbs), but that would be very rare and I'd be more likely to steal the diesel for that. My thoughts are that I'm well under the weight allowances, but people keep telling me I need a bigger truck to haul anything, but I've seen F150s towing similar things to what I plan to tow.

I will have use of a big diesel for those days where I want to haul longer distances or more horses, but I wanted to make sure my truck could handle the short distances a few times a month when Alberta doesn't have snow. Trailer would not come out to play in the winter, which is basically 8 months of the year here.

Thank you!
 
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Old 05-24-2019, 07:17 PM
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I'm sure it will tow. However, it will not have the stopping power of a bigger truck.
 
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Old 05-24-2019, 07:51 PM
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Originally Posted by ManualF150 View Post
I'm sure it will tow. However, it will not have the stopping power of a bigger truck.
I understand I'd need to be more diligent about stopping and allow for a lot of stopping distance... is that what you mean, or that the truck will NOT stop the trailer with one horse in it?
 
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Old 05-24-2019, 08:11 PM
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It will stop. It's just that the F150 is designed for lighter trailers and such.

I've towed some ungodly heavy loads with my truck, it's just that you need to be aware of everything around you a little more.

Also, I think in Canada they are sticklers for pulling folks over if they believe they are over their weight limit.
 
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Old 05-24-2019, 08:18 PM
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Originally Posted by ManualF150 View Post
It will stop. It's just that the F150 is designed for lighter trailers and such.

I've towed some ungodly heavy loads with my truck, it's just that you need to be aware of everything around you a little more.

Also, I think in Canada they are sticklers for pulling folks over if they believe they are over their weight limit.
The cops here in Alberta are more concerned about commercial trailers and window tint, it seems.

I'm naturally a very careful, defensive driver. My fiancÚ makes fun of me for driving slowly (the speed limit!) because I don't trust the other idiots on the road. I've gotten to the point where I can stop my truck so gently and gradually that an open bottle of water on my dash doesn't spill. Seems like a strange thing to be proud of, but now that I worry about hauling my horses - I've gotta be extra careful!

The majority of my hauling adventures will be going down gravel roads or secondary highways that aren't overly busy, a total of 60km round trip. That way, I can drive even slower. Most folks around here don't really bother people hauling livestock - the perk of living smack in the middle of farming communities.
 
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Old 05-24-2019, 08:26 PM
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Also another question - my truck has a button called "Tow/Haul" mode. Google tells me this is something to do with overdrive. Do I need to push this button when I'm hauling and will it actually help? What does it actually do?
 
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Old 05-24-2019, 09:01 PM
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That button will help your transmission from hunting in and out of over drive. This is especially helpful in hilly environments.
 
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Old 05-24-2019, 09:13 PM
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A 5000# trailer is WELL within the limits of a F150 chassis and braking system, especially if the trailer has electric brakes. Your limiting factor is the 3.5 liter engine, if it's NOT the twin turbo Ecoboost, it may feel quite sluggish. Definitely use tow/haul mode, it reprograms the transmission to be optimized for towing. It will hold gears longer when accelerating and help with engine braking.
 
 


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