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Ecoboost 3.5L longevity

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  #1  
Old 07-13-2017, 02:35 PM
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Ecoboost 3.5L longevity

Is there a main thread on the subject? I couldn't find.

Was just curious about the latest info. I vouched for the ecoboost when my brother was looking and now he's getting both turbos replaced.

Is it possible the torture testing ford did between the dyno testing and the Baja run, they just can duplicate real world conditions?
 
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Old 07-13-2017, 04:56 PM
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Just with anything else, failures do happen. There were a million Eco's in F150's sold by 2015. A few examples of 200k+ miles with no issues due to the motor.

It seems that the 2011 and 2012 models were more common to have issues than later models. 2017's have the "Gen 2" version of the motor.

If your brother needs a set of turbo's, I have a stock set that I can sell.
 
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Old 07-13-2017, 05:58 PM
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One thing that people don't think about - turbocharged engines should be allowed to idle for a minute before shutting off to allow the turbos to spool down. This lets them cool off and avoids the bearings running dry.
 
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Old 07-13-2017, 09:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Blown F-150 View Post
Just with anything else, failures do happen. There were a million Eco's in F150's sold by 2015. A few examples of 200k+ miles with no issues due to the motor.

It seems that the 2011 and 2012 models were more common to have issues than later models. 2017's have the "Gen 2" version of the motor.

If your brother needs a set of turbo's, I have a stock set that I can sell.
Not sure the numbers but think it's pretty common. Alot of people were worried because of all the superduty's with turbo failures.
 
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Old 07-13-2017, 09:03 PM
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Originally Posted by glc View Post
One thing that people don't think about - turbocharged engines should be allowed to idle for a minute before shutting off to allow the turbos to spool down. This lets them cool off and avoids the bearings running dry.
Baja and dyno torture testing wouldn't have fixed that?
 
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Old 07-13-2017, 09:59 PM
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I'm speaking about ALL turbocharged engines - no matter what the manufacturer has added to try to eliminate this problem.
 
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Old 07-14-2017, 12:32 AM
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Originally Posted by fordification View Post
Not sure the numbers but think it's pretty common. Alot of people were worried because of all the superduty's with turbo failures.
Turbo failures are not common on the Eco's. Spend time on any forum where people are mainly there to find solutions to problems and you'll see.

The turbo's on the superduty's are very different and run double the boost levels than the Eco's. The turbo's in the Eco's are also water-cooled.

People are worried about anything different and look to pick a part things. It's been 6 model years now and close to 2 million on the road (with the 2.7).
 
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Old 07-14-2017, 12:34 AM
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Originally Posted by glc View Post
I'm speaking about ALL turbocharged engines - no matter what the manufacturer has added to try to eliminate this problem.
Although I personally agree and let mine idle for a minute or two after a drive, they say that the water-cooled circuit is designed to allow for coolant to continue to cool the turbos after the truck is shut off.
 
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Old 07-14-2017, 09:13 AM
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Thanks for the info guys. I'll relay the info to my brothers. I could've swore I read somewhere the turbos were a wide problem. His is a 14 so you would think he got passed the 1st gen problems.

Didn't know it was water cooled. He had a coolant leak from the turbos which I thought was strange.
 
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Old 07-14-2017, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Blown F-150 View Post
Although I personally agree and let mine idle for a minute or two after a drive, they say that the water-cooled circuit is designed to allow for coolant to continue to cool the turbos after the truck is shut off.
It's not just cooling - how are the turbos lubricated? If with engine oil, when you shut it off, you no longer have oil pressure.
 
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Old 07-14-2017, 12:44 PM
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Originally Posted by glc View Post
One thing that people don't think about - turbocharged engines should be allowed to idle for a minute before shutting off to allow the turbos to spool down. This lets them cool off and avoids the bearings running dry.
I was told the same thing by a guy who knows about engines.

I don't worry too much if I'm just out driving around... I figure its not that hot as I'm not making too much boost. Its not like I'm driving to work at WOT.

But any time I'm towing my 31' camper I let it idle for a good 5 minutes when I get where I'm going.... sometimes I'll pop the hood too and let out some heat. Its like opening an oven door - the heat just rolls off the engine after towing heavy.
 
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Old 07-14-2017, 01:25 PM
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Turbos have come a long way from the days my neighbor had to replace the turbo on his 79 Buick Riviera every 30k miles.
 
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Old 07-14-2017, 01:31 PM
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The bottom line with most things is that if you want the best reliability, buy the least complex. Base V6 or V8 would be it for the F150.

In the case of airplanes, the design for large planes went to two engines for fuel efficiency and less maintenance cost and they are considered to be reliable enough for the general population. But the President's plane has 4 engines just in case. You want maximum safety for the President where cost is not much of a consideration.
 
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Old 07-14-2017, 02:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Roadie View Post
The bottom line with most things is that if you want the best reliability, buy the least complex. Base V6 or V8 would be it for the F150.

In the case of airplanes, the design for large planes went to two engines for fuel efficiency and less maintenance cost and they are considered to be reliable enough for the general population. But the President's plane has 4 engines just in case. You want maximum safety for the President where cost is not much of a consideration.
That's a good plan if one remaining engine will sustain flight. The Air Force's O-2, used in Vietnam for Forward Air Control would not fly on just the forward engine. So with two engines, you simply doubled the chance of critical engine failure.

- Jack
 
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Old 07-14-2017, 04:51 PM
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Originally Posted by glc View Post
It's not just cooling - how are the turbos lubricated? If with engine oil, when you shut it off, you no longer have oil pressure.
How are the turbines going to be spinning without exhaust gasses going through them?

The thought behind letting a turbo engine idle after being run hard was to let the center hot section cool down while oil was being pumped through them. The older designs we're not water cooled and only used oil to cool and lubricate the bearings. The EB and most modern turbos use water to cool and oil to lubricate. Without the water the oil would take a long time to cool down and it could coke up in the hot section. The EB has the engine oil drain through the turbo and recirculates the coolant through the turbo after the engine is off. Unless you have been beating on it there really isn't a reason to let it idle.
 
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