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  #1  
Old 02-09-2009, 01:09 PM
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4.2 v6 vs. 4.0 v6

I noticed today when a little 4.0 Ranger drove by that it had a much more V8-like exhaust note than my 4.2 V6. Does anyone know why this is? And yes, the Ranger had a stock exhaust. The 4.2 sounds much more air-y if you know what I mean.
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  #2  
Old 02-09-2009, 03:11 PM
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If it was stock you wouldn't be able to hear it very well. My 02 4.0 ranger made hardly any sound at all.
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  #3  
Old 02-09-2009, 03:18 PM
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might have to do with the fact that our 4.2's have an odd firing order or that they're pushrod vs the ohc 4.0
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  #4  
Old 02-09-2009, 03:54 PM
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I used to have a 4.0 (pushrod) motor in a Ranger. Strong running little truck.

IMO, the big difference is that the 4.2 has a 90 degree V, while the 4.0 has a 60 degree V.

The 60 degree V6 results in a more balanced firing than a 90 degree 'odd firing' V6. While the 60 degree V6 is not natually evenly balanced like a 90 degree V8 is, the 60 degree is closer and therefore sounds a bit more like a V8 than a 90 degree V6 would.

Last edited by dirt bike dave; 02-09-2009 at 04:19 PM.
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  #5  
Old 02-09-2009, 04:44 PM
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Originally Posted by 04heritage View Post
If it was stock you wouldn't be able to hear it very well. My 02 4.0 ranger made hardly any sound at all.
It was definitely stock. It was a new looking FX4.

Thanks for all the replies.
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  #6  
Old 02-09-2009, 05:36 PM
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Cool. An odd question but a lot of good answers in this thread. Nice to learn something new.
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  #7  
Old 02-09-2009, 10:20 PM
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The Ford F150 Essex V6 engine (4.2L 205-210hp) is an even firing engine. The Ford Ranger Cologne V6 engine (4.0L 155-160hp) is an odd firing engine, just like the F150 4.6L and 5.4L. That’s why the 4.0L Ranger sounds more like a V8.

Even firing engines alternate fire from left to right. Odd firing engines have two double fires on the same side. Odd firing pulses double the exhaust output on the same exhaust bank during rotation. The added exhaust pressure unbalances the exhaust system, which is why odd firing engines need “X” pipes, “H” pipes, or a “Mac Chamber” to re-balance the exhaust.

Both engines have good power to weight ratios. The Cologne was built for smaller engine compartments (cross plane crank and 60 degree angle) to fit Taurus, Explorer, and Ranger. The Essex was built for weight (single plane crank, 90 degree angle) Mustang, Thunderbird, and F150.

Last edited by Stang2; 02-09-2009 at 10:22 PM.
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  #8  
Old 02-10-2009, 09:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stang2 View Post
The Ford F150 Essex V6 engine (4.2L 205-210hp) is an even firing engine. The Ford Ranger Cologne V6 engine (4.0L 155-160hp) is an odd firing engine, just like the F150 4.6L and 5.4L. That’s why the 4.0L Ranger sounds more like a V8.

Even firing engines alternate fire from left to right. Odd firing engines have two double fires on the same side. Odd firing pulses double the exhaust output on the same exhaust bank during rotation. The added exhaust pressure unbalances the exhaust system, which is why odd firing engines need “X” pipes, “H” pipes, or a “Mac Chamber” to re-balance the exhaust.

Both engines have good power to weight ratios. The Cologne was built for smaller engine compartments (cross plane crank and 60 degree angle) to fit Taurus, Explorer, and Ranger. The Essex was built for weight (single plane crank, 90 degree angle) Mustang, Thunderbird, and F150.
Good post....
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  #9  
Old 02-10-2009, 10:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stang2 View Post
The Ford F150 Essex V6 engine (4.2L 205-210hp) is an even firing engine. The Ford Ranger Cologne V6 engine (4.0L 155-160hp) is an odd firing engine, just like the F150 4.6L and 5.4L. That’s why the 4.0L Ranger sounds more like a V8.

Even firing engines alternate fire from left to right. Odd firing engines have two double fires on the same side. Odd firing pulses double the exhaust output on the same exhaust bank during rotation. The added exhaust pressure unbalances the exhaust system, which is why odd firing engines need “X” pipes, “H” pipes, or a “Mac Chamber” to re-balance the exhaust.

Both engines have good power to weight ratios. The Cologne was built for smaller engine compartments (cross plane crank and 60 degree angle) to fit Taurus, Explorer, and Ranger. The Essex was built for weight (single plane crank, 90 degree angle) Mustang, Thunderbird, and F150.

Sounds like you know your stuff so I ma not arguing but are those HP numbers at the wheel? My '03 Ranger 4.0 was rated at the crank 207, just an fyi. I am speaking of the '01+ SOHC in the ranger, not the OHV in previous years.
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  #10  
Old 02-10-2009, 01:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stang2 View Post
The Ford F150 Essex V6 engine (4.2L 205-210hp) is an even firing engine. The Ford Ranger Cologne V6 engine (4.0L 155-160hp) is an odd firing engine, just like the F150 4.6L and 5.4L. That’s why the 4.0L Ranger sounds more like a V8.

Even firing engines alternate fire from left to right. Odd firing engines have two double fires on the same side. Odd firing pulses double the exhaust output on the same exhaust bank during rotation. The added exhaust pressure unbalances the exhaust system, which is why odd firing engines need “X” pipes, “H” pipes, or a “Mac Chamber” to re-balance the exhaust.

Both engines have good power to weight ratios. The Cologne was built for smaller engine compartments (cross plane crank and 60 degree angle) to fit Taurus, Explorer, and Ranger. The Essex was built for weight (single plane crank, 90 degree angle) Mustang, Thunderbird, and F150.
Thank you! Very good explanation. It now makes perfect sense.
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  #11  
Old 02-10-2009, 07:30 PM
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Yetti96,

You're right. The OHV version of the Ranger up to 1999 is rated at 160hp (90 – 93 reported as 155). But the 2000 - present SOHC version is rated at 205-210 and dyno tests by aftermarket manufactures have shown this number to be under reported, damn.
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  #12  
Old 02-12-2009, 10:26 AM
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I've had the 3.0 and 4.0's in my old ranger, the 4.0 was an FX4. I don't know, but my '08 4.2 F150 sounds like more engine than my '06 5.4, especially at idle. Now, out on the road it may sound different. By far the "quickest" of them all was the 3.0, 2wd w/4.10's, that flew.
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  #13  
Old 06-08-2009, 08:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stang2 View Post
The Ford F150 Essex V6 engine (4.2L 205-210hp) is an even firing engine. The Ford Ranger Cologne V6 engine (4.0L 155-160hp) is an odd firing engine, just like the F150 4.6L and 5.4L. That’s why the 4.0L Ranger sounds more like a V8.

Even firing engines alternate fire from left to right. Odd firing engines have two double fires on the same side. Odd firing pulses double the exhaust output on the same exhaust bank during rotation. The added exhaust pressure unbalances the exhaust system, which is why odd firing engines need “X” pipes, “H” pipes, or a “Mac Chamber” to re-balance the exhaust.

Both engines have good power to weight ratios. The Cologne was built for smaller engine compartments (cross plane crank and 60 degree angle) to fit Taurus, Explorer, and Ranger. The Essex was built for weight (single plane crank, 90 degree angle) Mustang, Thunderbird, and F150.
The 4.0L SOHC is an even firing engine.
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  #14  
Old 06-08-2009, 09:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MosineeFX4 View Post
The 4.0L SOHC is an even firing engine.
thats cause he is referring to the OHV
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  #15  
Old 06-08-2009, 09:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4.2trimble View Post
thats cause he is referring to the OHV

Yes, but is not the firing order the same for the 4.0l ohv and SOHC as well as the 4.2l which would be 1-4-2-5-3-6. Aren't all of them even firing? Also, the poster said he thought it was a newer FX4, which would make it a SOHC?

Last edited by MosineeFX4; 06-08-2009 at 09:59 PM.
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Old 06-08-2009, 09:56 PM


 
 
 
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