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  #1  
Old 01-03-2010, 07:12 PM
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Coolant fell into cylinder from head removal

So, I'm in the process of replacing the head gaskets on my motor. I made the idiot move of not draining as much coolant out of the motor as I should have, and when I removed the head about a half cup of coolant poured into the cylinders on the drivers side. Bout a half cup total between all 4 cylinders... I dried everything up as fast as I could with paper towels and I'm gonna shop vac everything too to try and get everything out.

Anyone know if I have just ruined my motor, or if it'll be okay as long as I get everything nice and clean? Any advice will be much appreciated.

- Erik
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  #2  
Old 01-03-2010, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by scruffy View Post
So, I'm in the process of replacing the head gaskets on my motor. I made the idiot move of not draining as much coolant out of the motor as I should have, and when I removed the head about a half cup of coolant poured into the cylinders on the drivers side. Bout a half cup total between all 4 cylinders... I dried everything up as fast as I could with paper towels and I'm gonna shop vac everything too to try and get everything out.

Anyone know if I have just ruined my motor, or if it'll be okay as long as I get everything nice and clean? Any advice will be much appreciated.

- Erik
It should be fine, with what you have done to clean it up. Now just change the oil before cranking it up.
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  #3  
Old 01-03-2010, 07:18 PM
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It happens. Use paper towels to soak up whats left after you use the shop vac. If it's going to sit for an extended period of time spray some WD-40 or equivelant around the inside of the bores to prevent rusting. Change your oil and filter before you fire it up as some coolant may have migrated past the rings into the oil pan. You'll be fine.
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Old 01-03-2010, 07:25 PM
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Sweet, thanks a ton for the quick responses. I'm real glad I didn't mess anything up lol. I will definitely change the oil before I start it. Should have it all back together tommorrow so I don't think it'll sit long enough to rust the bores. Hopefully nothing else goes wrong lol.

Thanks again guys,

- Erik
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Old 01-03-2010, 07:37 PM
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x2 on oil and filter!
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  #6  
Old 01-03-2010, 10:38 PM
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You could start it first, then change your oil. That way the old oil will clean things up and take any left over traces of coolant away with it. The coolant will not ruin your engine, but it will ruin your oil, and that's what ruins your engine.
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Old 01-05-2010, 04:16 AM
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What do you think happens every time a mechanic pulls the head or heads on a vehicle? I can virtually guaranty they get coolant in the cylinders and I doubt they worry much about it (make that don't worry about it at all). I think you did more than they would even do to dry it. I wouldn't start it before I changed the oil though.
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Old 01-05-2010, 09:42 AM
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Originally Posted by code58 View Post
What do you think happens every time a mechanic pulls the head or heads on a vehicle? I can virtually guaranty they get coolant in the cylinders and I doubt they worry much about it (make that don't worry about it at all). I think you did more than they would even do to dry it. I wouldn't start it before I changed the oil though.
Agreed. If you want to clean out the coolant, pour oil in the top end of the engine to flush the coolant to the pan, but I wouldn't start it before the oil change.
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Old 01-05-2010, 03:16 PM
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Hmm, yeah, the problem is that we went ahead and drained the oil before I removed the head because I was going to change it any ways. So maybe I'll just get some cheapo oil to flush any remaining coolant out and use the old filter to run it for a little bit, then change the oil and filter with good oil.

- Erik
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  #10  
Old 01-06-2010, 03:51 AM
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Originally Posted by scruffy View Post
Hmm, yeah, the problem is that we went ahead and drained the oil before I removed the head because I was going to change it any ways. So maybe I'll just get some cheapo oil to flush any remaining coolant out and use the old filter to run it for a little bit, then change the oil and filter with good oil.

- Erik
You could use some cleaning solvent to flush the coolant down past the pistons and into the pan and then drain it good. I don't think it's any major deal if you didn't do anything more than you have. The professional mechanics sure don't, and they can't help but get some coolant in the cylinders when they take the heads off.
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Old 01-06-2010, 10:27 AM
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Originally Posted by code58 View Post
You could use some cleaning solvent to flush the coolant down past the pistons and into the pan and then drain it good. I don't think it's any major deal if you didn't do anything more than you have. The professional mechanics sure don't, and they can't help but get some coolant in the cylinders when they take the heads off.
This would be fine to do. But, if you use solvent to clean the pistons and cylinder walls, make sure to put some oil back on the cylinder walls before you reassemble. This will ensure that the rings are not washed out by the solvent. If the rings are washed out you could have no compression which would make it a PITA to restart.
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Old 01-06-2010, 10:33 AM
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I have always used brake clean to clean up the coolant as it will dry and not hurt anything in the engine.
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Old 01-07-2010, 03:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Murray99 View Post
I have always used brake clean to clean up the coolant as it will dry and not hurt anything in the engine.
Probably a good idea, and then re-oil the cylinders like Norseman said.
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Old 01-07-2010, 03:31 AM


 
 
 
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