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Old 01-28-2004, 03:17 PM
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WD-40 freezing point

Here is a tid-bit of information about the freezing point of WD-40 for those of us who use it in the winter in our door locks.

A representative from WD-40 replied to me in an email

"The Freezing point of WD-40 is -50 degree F"
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Old 01-29-2004, 09:23 AM
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You should not use WD40 on your door locks. It flushes out the dry lubricant used in locks. Ask any locksmith. Most of those lock deicers are bad as well, they do the same thing. I guess WD40 would be better than the deicers because it has its own lube. Use graphite or Molybdenum based powder lubes and you will not have frozen locks to begin with.

Last edited by Norm; 01-29-2004 at 09:25 AM.
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Old 01-29-2004, 06:01 PM
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WD-40

WD-40
is a good starting fluid for lawn mower thats about it
more propane than anthing else in can
just my opinion

mitch
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Old 01-29-2004, 06:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Norm
You should not use WD40 on your door locks. It flushes out the dry lubricant used in locks. Ask any locksmith. Most of those lock deicers are bad as well, they do the same thing. I guess WD40 would be better than the deicers because it has its own lube. Use graphite or Molybdenum based powder lubes and you will not have frozen locks to begin with.
"Graphite is the worse thing that you can use in a lock.....with a little moisture the graphite will cake up and man do you really have a mess then. I was told by a professional locksmith that the best thing to use is WD40. Get the lock thawed out and shoot it with WD40 real good. WD= Water Dispersant"

http://www.rv.net/forum/index.cfm/fu...g/13134747.cfm

http://www.blueglue.com/archives/vin.../msg00250.html

http://list.miata.net/miata/1998-07/1246.html

Last edited by temp1; 01-29-2004 at 07:04 PM.
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Old 01-30-2004, 09:07 AM
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I used to use ATF in the lock. Last batch of vehicles came with key fobs so I never use the key.

JMC
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Old 01-30-2004, 09:08 AM
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Take apart many locks? Most are dry lubed with graphite base or molybased lubes. Some are wet with moly or lithium based greases. The lube in WD40 is insufficient for locks. It is like you said a Water Dispersant and penetrant. It also contains solvents that will flush out any lube the lock may have had. Graphite only cakes when you use too much or when applied to a lock that is greased. Molybdenum Disulphide cakes even less.
Too many people think WD40 is a cure all. For some locksmiths it is job security. Thanks for the supportive links.

Last edited by Norm; 01-30-2004 at 09:14 AM.
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Old 01-30-2004, 04:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Norm
Take apart many locks? Most are dry lubed with graphite base or molybased lubes. Some are wet with moly or lithium based greases. The lube in WD40 is insufficient for locks. It is like you said a Water Dispersant and penetrant. It also contains solvents that will flush out any lube the lock may have had. Graphite only cakes when you use too much or when applied to a lock that is greased. Molybdenum Disulphide cakes even less.
Too many people think WD40 is a cure all. For some locksmiths it is job security. Thanks for the supportive links.
I know WD40 is not a cure all, heck, why even use WD40 when you can put some duct tape over the key hole to keep the water out... har, har, har!


Confucius say

"If it does not move, and its supposed to, use WD40. If it is moving, and its not supposed to, use duct tape."
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Old 01-30-2004, 09:43 PM
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i had my interior light stay on when my truck was 2 years old my soph year of high school. Hosed down the latch with WD40. Never had a prob since.
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Old 01-30-2004, 09:57 PM
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they're talking about spraying WD40 into the keyhole to keep it from freezing when you try to unlock the door...I think
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Old 01-31-2004, 11:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Johngs
they're talking about spraying WD40 into the keyhole to keep it from freezing when you try to unlock the door...I think
Thats what I do with mine. I use that little red tube that comes with the can and push the tube into the key hole a little bit. The other end of the tube inserts into the spray nozzle on the can. I give it a good squirt until it comes out of the keyhole and wipe the overflow off with a rag. I insert the key and turn it back and forth a few times. Don't use a lot of force turning the key if the lock is frozen when you do this. I think LOCK-DEICER is better since it is probably soluble with water but WD40 works in a pinch.
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Old 01-31-2004, 04:29 PM
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For what it is worth, a locksmith friend of mine loves WD-40. He makes lots of money from replacing lock cylinders that have been wrecked by the stuff. I would never put that crap in a lock, if I have a rusty bolt then I use WD-40. Marvel Mystery Oil, or gun lube both are much better. There is also lock oil, I don't remember the name, available.

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Old 01-31-2004, 06:05 PM
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Never had any problems using WD-40 on locks. I have a few Master Locks that are well over 10 years old and every year they get a shot of WD-40 and have worked flawless…
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Old 01-31-2004, 06:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Wookie
For what it is worth, a locksmith friend of mine loves WD-40. He makes lots of money from replacing lock cylinders that have been wrecked by the stuff. I would never put that crap in a lock, if I have a rusty bolt then I use WD-40. Marvel Mystery Oil, or gun lube both are much better. There is also lock oil, I don't remember the name, available.

Joe
I read where it can attract dirt (Perhaps with a sandy mixture) that can make it gritty and cause parts to wear faster. I suppose it could also cake up with dirt and clog the working parts.

What does your friend say that the WD-40 does to the locks?

What kind of locks? Car door locks? House Door? Other kinds of locks?

"The truth is out there somewhere..."

Last edited by temp1; 01-31-2004 at 06:14 PM.
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Old 01-31-2004, 06:29 PM
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Well I'm not sure about the bad rap on WD40. I've been using it in my car locks for 35 years and haven't had a problem in all that time. When you live in MN and run your car through the car wash, water dispersant is exactly what you need. Otherwise your locks freeze shut.
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Old 01-31-2004, 06:29 PM


 
 
 
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