So you broke off one of your exhaust studs flush with the head - what now - F150online Forums

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So you broke off one of your exhaust studs flush with the head - what now

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Old 08-15-2011, 04:29 PM
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So you broke off one of your exhaust studs flush with the head - what now

Here are a couple of tricks I learned trying to remove three exhaust studs that snapped off flush with the head without removing the heads from the engine. Turns out that the stud Ford uses has a shoulder that damages the first 1/8 to 3/16" of the threads. It is this damaged area that prevents you from extracting the stud.

Extra tools for the job - an air powered right angle drill, you guessed it an air compressor, assorted small drill bits, a jobbers length 3/8" drill bit, and a #3 easy out. First remove the inner fender well cover. Next with the exhaust manifold removed drill a progressively larger pilot hole in the broken stud. Be very careful to drill with light pressure, if you snap the drill bit off in the stud you are in a world of hurt. Once you have reached the proper size for your #3 easy out, you can stop. During this process it is quite likely that the stud has actually been driven further into the head, this is fine. Now take the jobbers length 3/8" drill bit and use it to remove the first 1/8 to 3/16" of the threads in the head, not on the broken stud. Once you have removed this area, install the easy out and walk the stud out. All three came out like butter after I removed the damaged area in the head. Hope this helps someone out there.

Last edited by KTrostel; 08-15-2011 at 04:39 PM.
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Old 08-15-2011, 04:34 PM
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great post! I made it a sticky thread so it will stay at the top of the forum. Thanks for the contribution.
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  #3  
Old 08-21-2011, 08:24 AM
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I did the same with the easy out, but the easy out broke inside of the stud. Now what! I tried welding a nut to it, but with the easy out in there is was not easy. Once the nut was welded, the stud can out really easy.
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Old 10-10-2011, 10:42 PM
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Hey, just a quick question. I installed a new throttle body on my 1996 F-150 4.9L and in doing so I twisted one of the mounting bolts that attached the assembly to the upper manifold. How serious is this? I know this is a rooky mistake, lol.
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  #5  
Old 04-09-2012, 05:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Crash! View Post
A good bet is a LEFT handed drill bit and a reversible drill. Most often you will need nothing else. If it is corroded, hit it with WD-40 before you begin.
I agree, If you can punch it dead center. Combination heat and reverse action will spin them right out.

If they break inside the thread chamber, it's more fun. Since the break isn't usually flat, I've had to use a small carbide burr to port a center pilot before drilling. If your attempting to save the threads, it works if your careful.
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Old 05-28-2012, 07:58 AM
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Originally Posted by KTrostel View Post
Here are a couple of tricks I learned trying to remove three exhaust studs that snapped off flush with the head without removing the heads from the engine. Turns out that the stud Ford uses has a shoulder that damages the first 1/8 to 3/16" of the threads. It is this damaged area that prevents you from extracting the stud.

Extra tools for the job - an air powered right angle drill, you guessed it an air compressor, assorted small drill bits, a jobbers length 3/8" drill bit, and a #3 easy out. First remove the inner fender well cover. Next with the exhaust manifold removed drill a progressively larger pilot hole in the broken stud. Be very careful to drill with light pressure, if you snap the drill bit off in the stud you are in a world of hurt. Once you have reached the proper size for your #3 easy out, you can stop. During this process it is quite likely that the stud has actually been driven further into the head, this is fine. Now take the jobbers length 3/8" drill bit and use it to remove the first 1/8 to 3/16" of the threads in the head, not on the broken stud. Once you have removed this area, install the easy out and walk the stud out. All three came out like butter after I removed the damaged area in the head. Hope this helps someone out there.
Great article and advice. For those who may not know, drill bits and easy outs are heat treated. This makes them quite hard and brittle, like glass. So like glass, they do not like to bend or flex much. Keep your tools going straight and you can avoid snapping off drills and easy outs(usually!) Land of Giants.
One more idea. If you have the room, (I have never had to do this on a F150 so the room may not be there) As a tool make/machinist we woulf often use a piece with a pilot bushing to guide the drill where we want it to go without walking/moving around.
Use the existing bolt hole in the manifold as a guide for a drill that fits snug in the manifold bolt hole. Keep manifold in place using a couple of bolts. The drill that fits the bolt hole in the manifold will be held straight as the existing hole acts as a pilot bushing. Now just drill in about 1/8" or so (inspect as you go) this will make a perfectly centered pocket for you to now use the other smaller drills being more likely to stay in the center of the stud your removing.
Certaily the other fella's suggestiuon of liquid wrench etc and a left hand drill and drill bit is a great idea.
I do have two 2002 F150 w/ 5.4 with exhaust leak. I am hoping its not the manifold, but fear the worse. I'll pass this one to my mechanic as I do not with to tackle the job.

Last edited by land of giants; 05-28-2012 at 10:32 AM. Reason: signature
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Old 05-28-2012, 09:06 AM
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n WD-40 removing nuts, bolts etc. Spray wait 5 minutes, extract. When I want to work on chassis items, I spray/soak nite before all connections, next morning easier disassembly. Always steady torque on tools removing nuts, bolts etc., never jerking!
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Old 09-18-2013, 10:25 PM
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Will I have issues with stock manifold bolt removal on a 05 f-150 4.6l?
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  #9  
Old 09-26-2013, 12:19 AM
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Will I have issues with stock manifold bolt removal on a 05 f-150 4.6l?
.?
Truck has been in va since I bought it new. Never at the beach. Mild winters here. Should I have issues removing mine?
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  #10  
Old 09-30-2013, 07:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Pageracing View Post
.?
Truck has been in va since I bought it new. Never at the beach. Mild winters here. Should I have issues removing mine?
Most likely. Super hot head temps then cooling, sweeting etc. causes metals to rust or corrode. Especially dissimilar metals that touch each other.
Soak well with liquid wrench for a few days in advance as suggested by another is always a good idea.
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Old 12-19-2014, 09:05 PM
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most of the time it is the tension on the rusted bolt that causes it to snap off . cut the head of the bolt / retaining nut off to release tension( torch , cut off wheel , dremel etc ) remove manifold and with stud extractor some PBblaster and a map or propane torch they wind right out ... just did it this way piece of cake .

Last edited by fastzilla; 12-19-2014 at 09:09 PM.
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  #12  
Old 02-27-2016, 07:11 PM
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Helicoil?

Ok, so I attempted to do this repair and messed up the drilling of the broken stud pretty bad. I think my only option now is to helicoil the hole. Has anyone down this, and if so what did you use? I have found a kit that would allow me to use the original studs, but just want to be sure. Thanks in advance for the help!
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Old 02-29-2016, 08:00 AM
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he needs to use helicoil

If for whatever reason, you now need to repair the threaded hole by drilling and using a helicoil, keep these things in mind.

I suggest you check my earlier post about using the manifold as a guide for the drill. You may or may not have used that tip trying to get the bolt out. You can still use that plan to guide your drill for the helicoil job. Sounds like your stud hole is buggered up (technical term) so drilling for the helicoil with out the manifold as a guide may get you into more trouble.
Short cuts often cause more problems. If not already done, follow one of the other fella's good advice and remove the inner fender or even the outer fender if need be to give yourself some needed room to work.

Remember drills and easyout and taps don't flex/bend, at least not much - they snap off. The easyout and taps can snap from excessive twisting pressure as well. So don't just try muscling the job, use some judgment here.

When tapping the new hole (making new threads) only turn the tap 1 to 3 turns in and then back it out. Use WD 40 with the nozzle tube or other lube to force the thread chips out under pressure as you work . Chips can load up in the flutes of the tap and cause it to bind, then even trying to back it out can be an issue at times.
Use the manifold to guide the tap straight as well if possible.

Make sure your tap is sharp/new not one that has been used multiple times or bouncing around in the bottom of someone's tool box as a dull tap will cause more problems than you already have. Hope this helps.
I need some stock exhaust manifolds if anyone has some laying around.
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  #14  
Old 02-29-2016, 08:08 AM
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Thanks for the great advice! I will be using a new tap for the helicoil as I need to purchase it. I have done some research on this and I need to use a 21/64 drill bit to clear the hole for the tap. Since that is much larger than the hole in the manifold, my plan is to make a template out of wood to make sure the hole is centered and straight. Thanks again for those tips!
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  #15  
Old 03-07-2016, 07:58 AM
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exhaust stud repair

I realize the helicoil drill is larger. The exhaust manifold is used to start the process and be certain your starter hole is as near centered in the broken stud as possible. Once you have a smaller hole started in the stud, you can switch off to a new template if you like. The plan of a wood template in the beginning is not the best idea as the drill may try to walk off center on the jiggered broken stud surface. The wood may not hold the drill centered as it is soft and may deteriorate during the process.
I suggest your secondary template with the larger hole for the helicoil drill be mad of metal. Again you can use the exhaust manifold as a guide for two or more adjacent stud holes and the hole for the broken stud.
As a mechanic, machinist and tool maker for 50 years I have removed more broken bolts etc. than I can count. Drills take the least path of resistance as the point of the drill will follow the lowest spot on the face of the broken bolt and you will find it difficult to keep it centered on the jiggered face of the broken stud. Remember to not go too deep all at once and lubricate the drills with WD 40 or Kerosene. Good luck
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